“American Desperado” by Jon Roberts & Evan Wright

miami

Cocaine Cowboy

Years ago, I saw the documentary Cocaine Cowboys. The documentary was about the transformation of Miami from a sleepy vacation and retirement destination in the 1960s to a hub of drug trafficking and murder in the late 1970s and 1980s. The story was enthralling. It transcended a normal documentary and unfolded like an action movie. The characters include drug traffickers, hitmen, murderers, shady attorneys, the cops on the front lines and the reporters of the era who documented the carnage. The documentary is on Netflix if you want to check it out.

In the documentary, the two most fascinating characters to me were the drug smugglers, Jon Roberts and Mickey Munday. In the documentary, both were portrayed as largely non violent, which made them more appealing. In the documentary, it was the hitmen that were the savage and violent characters. Munday and Roberts were largely non-violent, which made them stand out. They appeared to be far more intelligent than the characters they were forced to associate with. While they were criminals, they weren’t psychopaths like many of the hitmen and drug kingpins that they were dealing with. When I heard that Jon Roberts wrote a book called American Desperado about his experiences, I was excited to read it.

I feel that this blog entry is incomplete without Jan Hammer

The Dark Side

The book revealed a much darker side to Jon Roberts’ persona than what was in the documentary. Jon admits that he is an evil person. His motto for his life was “evil is strong”. While in elementary school, he witnessed his father murder another man and suffer no consequences for it. The young Jon was amazed that in real life (unlike the movies), bad people frequently got away bad things. This was a truly terrible lesson to absorb at a young age. As Jon learned far too late in life, bad things do catch up with bad people. Karma is real.

The early childhood trauma and lack of a positive father figure propelled Jon on a criminal path. In his youth, he was a juvenile delinquent. He spent his time robbing people and reacting violently to anyone who crossed him. He abused drugs and alcohol. After being arrested, Jon was offered the opportunity to avoid lengthy prison time by enlisting in the military during the Vietnam War. In Vietnam, where he behaved like a murderous psychopath. For instance, there is a section of the book where he describes how to skin a person alive. The description is terrifying. His criminal career evolved from early experiences setting up drug deals with the intention of robbing people, drug dealing, to becoming embedded in the New York mafia and managing night clubs.

Jon had some clashes with made men and was tied to a murder. This led to a falling out with the mafia. Jon had to flee New York City to get away from the police and the mafia. Jon was able to leave the geography of New York and reinvent himself in a new location. He decided on Miami because he had family there. He begins in Miami by trying to live a straight life with a dog training business but quickly strays back into his criminal ways.

Drug Kingpin

Slowly in Miami, Jon evolves in the preeminent drug smuggler in the area. He estimates that his fortune at one point exceeded $100 million. He still engages in violent behavior. He alludes to murders during this time period, but it is not nearly as violent as his time in New York. Still, Jon is relatively tame compared to his counterparts at the time. His lifestyle is unbelievably decadent and he describes this in depth as well.

In one amazing incident, Jon organizes a trafficking operation on behalf of the CIA. He then contends that Barry Seal did this as well, which appears to be supported by evidence. Barry Seal later became an informant. The Colombian drug cartels also ask Jon to kill him. Later, they did this themselves without Jon’s help.

Eventually, Jon is arrested after the government obtains information acquired through an informant and close business associate of Jon’s, Max Mermelstein. He spends years living as a fugitive in both Colombia and Mexico. While in Mexico, he is arrested as a result of their version of America’s Most Wanted. He ultimately escapes from the Mexican prison and hides in the United States in Delaware, until he is ultimately arrested in the early 1990s.

Jon also has a son, whom he genuinely loves. Despite his seemingly tranquil family life in the 2000s, Jon knows deep inside that his demise is coming. He actually says that he spent his life in service of the devil and expects God to punish him with a painful death. Ultimately, Jon died of cancer in 2011.

Mickey Munday

The book left me with a still largely positive image of Mickey Munday. Unlike Jon, Mickey was truly non violent and an incredibly smart guy. He didn’t engage in any materialistic flashiness. He was involved in drug smuggling solely for the challenge and fun of it. He is incredibly innovative. In one amazing section of the book, it is described how Mickey developed a stealth boat after reading about the stealth bomber in a magazine. He equipped the boat with a silent drive and navigated at night without lights while he wore night vision goggles and the boat was invisible to radar. As a nice touch, he would ride the stealth boat while listening to Phil Collins’ In the Air Tonight on his headphones. Mickey didn’t do drugs and his main vice was milk and cookies. He was the most fascinating and likable character to me. I wish Mickey would write a book, as I would love to read more about him.

Recommendation

I liked the book, but I can’t recommend it to anyone who wants to read a book with a likeable protagonist. Jon is a scoundrel. With that said, he at least admits it and doesn’t try to sugar coat it. He is completely honest about the evil in his life. He was a murderer and likely a psychopath. I imagine watching his father commit murder seeped into him and left an impression which impacted his mentality throughout his life. At one point, he talks about the best way to kick someone’s face with a steel toed boot and you can detect that he actually enjoys it, as evidenced by the level of detail in his description. Amazingly, despite a lifetime spent in crime, the most horrific activities that Jon engages in are in Vietnam.

Despite Jon’s admitted evil, he is actually quite charming and at times very funny. A particularly humorous incident involves Jon and OJ Simpson, who apparently had an insatiable appetite for Jon’s drugs. After a drug binge, Jon must take Simpson to an airport on the morning of a game and leads Simpson through the airport in a wheelchair because he is unconscious and will not wake up.

Jon’s story is a fascinating one, but I was also left wondering how much of it was actually true because the stories are so extreme that some of them sound fabricated. To his credit, the co-author Evan Wright attempts to document as much as possible and offers his own commentary on the validity of Jon’s claims. Evan also conducted interview of Jon’s associates and those perspectives are also included in the book.

I can’t recommend this book to everyone, but if you can stomach reading the life of a truly evil man with extraordinary life experiences, then you should check it out.

PLEASE NOTE: The information provided on this site is not financial advice and it is for informational and discussion purposes only. Do your own homework. Full disclosure: my current holdings.  Read the full disclaimer.

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